Biodegradable Security Seals Switch For Nestlé Logistics.

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Nestlé UK has become the first major company to switch to a new biodegradable security seal for use on its transport fleet.

The Nestlé UK logistics team will team up with Mega Fortris Group to source and use their world first biodegradable security seal.

Security seals are a crucial tool for the logistics team to help prevent breaches of lorries and to indicate when a load might have been tampered with. Every load that departs Nestlé will use a plastic seal and that quickly adds up to more than 200,000 seals used and discarded every single year.

The decision to move to biodegradable seals came from an exercise run by the Nestlé team to find opportunities to reduce waste and improve the sustainability of Nestlé’s logistics operation.

Richard Hastings, Head of Logistics for Nestlé UK & Ireland said:

“Everybody at Nestlé is increasingly conscious of how we use plastic and these seals, which are simply thrown away once used, were an obvious and very visible single use of plastic in our area.”

“We set about looking for a better option and that’s when we got in touch with Mega Fortris. We will now switch to the new biodegradable seal for all of our loads to make a small but important change to the impact of our plastic waste.”

Keith Edgar, Managing Director of Mega Fortris (UK) said:

“We are delighted to be working in partnership with Nestlé to introduce the biodegradable seals. Mega Fortris is aware of the impact plastic waste is having on our everyday lives, and is continually working on sustainability to the environment and are very pleased that Nestlé also recognise the importance of this. “

The Mega Fortris seal is a biodegradable plastic that can be biologically broken down once used but still offers the same properties required as an important security tool for logistics teams.

Nestlé is working to reduce its reliance on single use plastics worldwide and has pledged to make all of its packaging recyclable or reusable by 2025.

Editorial Team

Editorial Team